Cable Management Options For Your Cables

Cable management is important when it comes to large installations of cabling and wires. If not properly installed or if placed without care wiring and cables can easily become damaged, broken, or kinked causing complications with interruptions in the lines. There are many ways to manage your cabling installations to help create a neat and tidy area and depending on the location of the cables will depend on the type of cable management device will be needed. Here is a helpful guide of the different cable management options you can choose to help manage and tidy your cabling installations.

Options For Cable Management

cable managementCable Ties: Cable Ties are one of the best ways of keeping your cables and wires tidy. Cable ties are specially designed ties which are made to wrap around your cable bundles securing them in place in a neat and tidy way. These ties are best suited for small to medium sized cable bundles and are available in a number of different sizes and makes of materials which can withstand long term use in demanding locations. For industrial cable management, stainless steel cable ties may be used. For smaller or less bulky setups a nylon cable tie is the right choice. Other options include reusable and permanent cable tie options. Reusable cable ties are great for temporary cable setups while permanent should be used when the cable bundle will be in place for years to come.

Sleeving Cover: Braided sleeving along with wire loom and heat shrink tubing are great options to help not only protect cable managementyour cables but manage them in a neat way. These types of sleeving options are similar to that of a hose and generally cover smaller amounts of wires and cables to create a neater and tidier method of cable management. These are beneficial for home and office use and come available in different types of materials which can handle different applications with ease. For temporary cover of your cables braided sleeving and wire loom are the best options. For a more permanent solution heat shrink tubing can be beneficial.

cable management 3Patch Panels: Patch Panels are designed for commercial based cable applications where networking cables are used. These patch panel systems are designed from high strength materials and are made to hold excess patch cable lengths in a tidy and neat compartment area. These work by coiling the excess cabling and simply sliding them into place. They are designed to support a great bend radius without damaging cables or causing problems with your applications.

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Patch Panel Information Guide

patch panelPatch panels are used in networking applications right around the world. But if you are new to these beneficial setups then here is some information that may be beneficial for you if you are looking to purchase one in the near future.

What Is A Patch Panel

A patch panel is a panel of interconnecting ports which are contained together to easily connect outgoing and incoming lines of LAN or other electrical or electronic communication systems. With LAN setups, a patch panel is designed to connect networking computers to one another and also to the outside lines which allow for the LAN to easily connect to a WAN or the internet. The patch panel uses patch cords which provide the connections between the devices and lines. These panels allow for the circuits to be arranged or rearranged accordingly by easily plugging and unplugging patch cords.

The Structure Of A Patch Panel

Usually found in a server closet, a patch panel is mounted to a rack and is generally installed with other equipment. From here the lines will be integrated in from all parts of the network allowing for easy wiring to the back of the panel. The front panels generally feature many ports which can easily connect switches, routers, or hubs with shorter cables to allow for many different configurations. These can easily be labeled for organization purposes.

Easy Troubleshooting Solution

Network patch panels provide a great means of trouble shooting when there is a problem in the network. If a problem arises the user can easily isolate the problem section by disconnecting different parts of the network lines right at the patch panel itself. Once this is done, the lines can be added back into the patch panel until the problem is rectified and found.

Do You Need A Patch Panel?

A patch panel is ideal for larger networking applications. If you have minimal devices that can be connected directly from the router or switch to the computer then it may not be needed. If you run a larger networking system, you may find that you need more organization and flexibility. Patch panels are a great idea for these types of systems and for maintaining order with many wires while providing an all-in-one connection point for easy changing and fixing of the wires if needed. The benefit of using a patch panel in larger applications is that it provides easy expansion of the system if needed with the ability to add new devices and connections.

 

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SpaceGAIN Angled Patch Panel: Gravity Compliance, Not Gravity Defiance

September 7, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Network Products 

spacegain-angled-patch-panelIt seems like everywhere you turn, someone’s trying to defy gravity. Take a look around – we have aircraft, spacecraft, supportive undergarments that are more heavily-engineered than aircraft and spacecraft combined, and industrial epoxy-strength hair products, without which we wouldn’t have Snooki, Pauly D, or the rest of Jersey Shore, for that matter.

Sometimes the gravity defiance works, sometimes it doesn’t (see “Jersey Shore”). The point is, it’s always there. But what about working with gravity, for once? Novel idea, right? I think so – especially when it comes to things like patch cords. Everyone worries about strain relief, because patch cords that plug into patch panels at 90 degree angles tend to, thanks to gravity, sag under their own weight, which can lead to signal attenuation and other damage. But instead of reinforcing network cables, why not let them just go with the flow? This epiphany courtesy of the pros at Black Box, who have developed the SpaceGAIN patch panel based on that very same “just go with it” principle.

SpaceGAIN patch panels, unlike the common garden variety, have ports that tilt downward at a 45 degree angle, so that once plugged in, patch cables can just flow gently (and naturally) downward, instead of jutting out at 90 degree angles and then dropping downward in tight (and possibly signal-damaging) arcs. Nice and easy – no attenuation, no bend radius issues. And because of the downward slope, the cords don’t stick out as far, leaving you with a little extra room in your rack or enclosure… and in a densely-packed server room, that never hurts.

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